AP Annual Conference 2007
College board

July 13 - 14 at Venetian Resort in Las Vegas


Subject: Chinese Etymology

Presenter: Tienzen (Jeh-Tween) Gong

Abstract and outline:

While there are at least 60,000 Chinese characters in the Chinese dictionary, an average educated native Chinese person learns about 6,000 Chinese Characters one at a time, as stand-alone characters.
Thus, Chinese written language is viewed as one of the hardest languages to learn. In this session, participants will learn that the Chinese word system is a 100 percent word root system with only 220 word roots, and it could be simpler than the high school geometry. The original meaning of every word can be read out loud from its face, and any educated foreigner who did not know a single Chinese character could master the Chinese word system within six months. At the end of this session, participants will know why a given word is written as it is.




More than 90 AP Chinese teachers attended this session.















For more info on Chinese language and etymology, the followings are useful links.
  1. Chinese Language blog
  2. Is it wrong to the young students?
  3. The world record on learning Chinese written language
  4. Best Chinese website
  5. Chinese Cultural Studies, Brooklyn, CUNY
  6. History of China
  7. Medieval China, Berkeley
  8. Court life in China, Virginia University
  9. Two Years in the Forbidden City
  10. Mathematics in China, Clark University
  11. Oracle bones
  12. Thinking Chinese
  13. Chinese sites hub
  14. A Chinese Text Sampler
  15. Chinese English Center, Maine University
  16. Greetings in Chinese w/sound
  17. Chinese Multimedia Tutorial
  18. Learn to Write Characters
  19. Conversational Mandarin Chinese Online
  20. Learning Chinese from Dartmouth University
  21. USC Chinese Department
  22. Video Clips of Survival Chinese
  23. Academia Sinica (Taiwan)
  24. (Taiwan Ministry of Education)
  25. Chinese dictionary from Taiwan Ministry of Education
  26. Taiwan Universities sites
  27. Asia for Educators, Columbia University
  28. Language Log
  29. zhongwen.com
  30. Chineseetymology.org
  31. yellowbridge.com
  32. wikipedia.China